What are the grounds for Appeal?


The Grounds for appeal are listed in Section 2.4 of the Academic Appeals Procedure and are as follows:

 

(1) The Examination Board failed to take into account all work submissible and properly submitted for assessment. You may select this ground if you consider that you have for example submitted work to your College/School on time but it has not been marked.  

(2) There was evidence of a computational or administrative error in arriving at the end of level/part decision. Please note this ground does NOT cover where you may consider that you should have been awarded a higher mark than you were for an assessment/s. Such would be questioning academic judgment, which is not a ground for appeal.

(3) Evidence of prejudice or of bias or of inadequate assessment, not of an academic nature, on the part of one or more of the examiners. If you consider that the examiner was biased/prejudice against you, you will need to provide clear evidence to demonstrate this. Usually work is assessed anonymously and therefore an examiner would not know your identity when marking your work. You may NOT select this ground if you consider that you should have been awarded a higher mark than you were for an assessment/s. Such would be questioning academic judgment, which is not a ground for appeal.

(4) Defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examination or in written instructions or in advice relating thereto which are of such a nature as to cause reasonable doubt as to whether the examiners would have reached the same decision had they not occurred. Candidates must provide a compelling reason for not bringing to the attention of their College the defects or irregularities when they occurred. You may select this ground where for example you consider that there was a problem with the conduct of an examination, such as the correct amount of time was not allowed for the examination, or where advice provided in an examination room related to the examination was incorrect. Provided you also have a compelling reason for not bringing this to the attention of your College at the time the problem occurred. 

(5) The examiners were aware of, but did not fully consider, defects or irregularities in the conduct of the examination or in written instructions or in advice relating thereto, when such defects or irregularities or advice might, in the candidate’s opinion, have had an adverse effect on his/her performance. If selecting this ground you will need to show that you notified the College of the defect or irregularity and explain how you consider the College/Examiners did not fully consider this in terms of your academic decision. You will also need to explain how those defects or irregularities had an adverse effect on your performance.

(6) Extenuating circumstances (as defined with the Policy on Extenuating Circumstances Affecting Assessment) which the Examiners were not aware of and which had an adverse effect on the candidate's academic performance. Please note, specific guidance for the use of this ground can be found at the end of this FAQ document.

Last update:
04-06-2020 18:01
Author:
Joanna Parketny
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